People Believe Falsehoods

This is quite frightening.  55% of those polled think the Constitution of the United States established a Christian nation.  There is not one mention of any deity in the Constitution; not one.
Half say teachers should use the Bible as a factual textbook in history classes.  Seriously?  Did you know there’s no archaeological evidence for the Jews wandering in the desert for forty years?  Did you think that three million people might have left a slight impression?

56% think that freedom of religion applies to everyone.  The others say that there are some groups that don’t deserve the same freedom they want for themselves.
On the plus side, “only” 25% say the First Amendment goes too far, which is better than five years ago, when it was half.

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Gary

Random gibberish from my mind, mostly dealing with technology, cooking, politics, and my family. Occasional cat posts - be warned.

3 thoughts on “People Believe Falsehoods”

  1. Dude, crap like this is why I sometimes seriously consider moving to Canada. I can’t understand why, when I learned in MY history classes that there is almost NO other record to support 90% of what’s in the Bible, so many other people believe everything in it is an accurate accounting of history!! Real historians have said that non-biblical evidence exists to prove that a man named Jesus DID exist, DID manage to piss off the Roman government, and DID get executed over it, but that’s about it. I don’t think there’s any other historical records to prove any of the rest of it, unless you count the things the Christians stole from older religions, like Noah’s Ark.
    Shit, even my own father thinks I’m making too big of a deal over one of my daughter’s HIGH SCHOOL TEACHERS mentioning God making the universe in a publically funded school He says “what harm does it do?”. Oh, gee, only violates separation between church and state, perpetuates superstitious dogma, contradicts what Marcella’s been allowed to learn on her own. (I’ve never TAUGHT her to be an atheist, I merely gave her the option.) The day a teacher brings a bible to history class and tries to teach my daughter the contents as accurate fact is the day I expatriate to a country where that would never happen.

  2. I’m not trying to be anti-theist, but the fact that so many people living in this country don’t understand the fundamentals of its founding is frightening.

  3. Gary, my gay atheist professor in college had us studying the New Jerusalem bible for part of our honors Western Civ. course. It’s one of the major surviving documents for a period of time in that part of the world. The various invasions and Crusades probably took out a lot of the competition 😛

    He happily pointed out the two conflicting Creation stories.

    Of course, he also had us studying translations of the Epic of Gilgamesh, and Italian merchant documents from the Renaissance period.

    It was a great class. In LOUISIANA, yet… who’dathunkit?

    ~ R

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